Marfa Lights Solved

For generations, Native Americans and other Americans have been captivated by the mystery lights of Marfa, Texas. Although most of the lights have been explained away as simply car headlights, a significant minority of the sightings have been inexplicable. Those low-elevation flying lights that are absent for many days or even weeks, appearing only a few times each year—those are called “CE-III” by the rocket scientist James Bunnell, who participated (on the ground) in all of the manned Apollo missions.

Those Marfa Lights, that sometimes fly with evidences of chemical and/or electromagetic properies, have now been explained, but not by Mr. Bunnell. Jonathan Whitcomb, a cryptozoologist in Long Beach, California, compares those lights with the ropen lights and Cheesman lights of Papua New Guinea. Those lights are associated with sightings of large nocturnal flying creatures, unclassified by modern science, that are believed to be bioluminescent.

An Explanation for Marfa Lights

Ropens in Texas might be hunting bats, but how could dancing help them catch bats? Insects! Of course lights attract insects. After two ropens have glowed in one area long enough to concentrate insects, they separate for awhile to allow the bats to feel safe in catching those insects. Soon the ropens return to catch the bats . . .

. . . So why did the two lights of May 7th [2003, videotaped by the scientist James Bunnell] go out before reaching the original location? Think about it. Several bats are grabbing a few insects while also keeping track of a nearby dancing, glowing bat-eater. Is it really a free lunch? The other two bat-eaters, having turned off their glow, are streaking into that area at high speed, relying on the dancing bat-eater to hold the attention of the bats.

Mountain near Marfa, Texas

Mountain near Marfa, Texas

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Long Beach Child Care

 

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  1. […] Marfa Lights Solved Although most of the [Marfa Lights] have been explained away as simply car headlights, a significant minority of the sightings have been inexplicable. Those low-elevation flying lights [appear] only a few times each year—those are called “CE-III” by the rocket scientist James Bunnell . . . Jonathan Whitcomb, a cryptozoologist in Long Beach, California, compares those lights with the ropen lights and Cheesman lights of Papua New Guinea. Those lights are associated with sightings of large nocturnal flying creatures, unclassified by modern science, that are believed to be bioluminescent. Uncategorized    Child Care in Long Beach and Lakewood » […]

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